Dating of the book of daniel

16-Aug-2016 23:23

The Christian Old Testament Book of Daniel in both the Septuagint and the Vulgate consists of two distinct kinds of narrative, historical and prophetic, in three parts.

The Book of Daniel [Hebrew: דניאל] has 14 chapters and is the book of the Bible that interested Isaac Newton the most.

It contains the prophecy of the arrival of the "Son of Man" and other predictions.

His narrative may be said in general to intervene between Kings and Chronicles on the one hand and Ezra on the other, or (more strictly) to fill out the sketch which the author of the Chronicles gives in a single verse in his last chapter: 'And them that had escaped from the sword carried he [i.e., Nebuchadnezzar] away to Babylon; where they were servants to him and his sons until the reign of the kingdom of Persia'." (2 Chronicles ).

Some suggest that the second part was written hundreds of years later, perhaps based on an oral tradition, but it was nevertheless certainly written well before Christ.

It is included in the canon of the Ethiopian Orthodox Bible.

Since the Council of Trent it is dogmatically accepted as inspired and canonical "with all its parts" by the Catholic Church in the Catholic Bible—books of the Bible accepted as divinely inspired by the majority of Christian believers in the United States and throughout the world.

These separated texts are regarded as apocryphal by less than one-third of Christian believers, most of whom have never read them.Some late 20th century and early 21st century Ecumenical editions of the Bible have restored these to their original places in the Book of Daniel according to their placement by Jerome in the Vulgate Bible.The Book of Daniel was originally written in Hebrew, and was part of the books of the Septuagint, the Old Testament of the Apostles and the early Christian Church.This book is accepted as inspired and canonical by the Orthodox Church in the Greek Orthodox Bible, and in the books of the Old Testament of the Vulgate, and was included in the canon of inspired scripture by Pope Damasus I and the Synod of Rome (382), and subsequent councils such as the Council of Hippo (393), the Third Council of Carthage (397), and reaffirmed at the Council of Florence of the (briefly reunited) Church of the east and west in 1442.The Book of Daniel has never been ranked among the Nevi'im, or Prophets, by the Jews.

These separated texts are regarded as apocryphal by less than one-third of Christian believers, most of whom have never read them.

Some late 20th century and early 21st century Ecumenical editions of the Bible have restored these to their original places in the Book of Daniel according to their placement by Jerome in the Vulgate Bible.

The Book of Daniel was originally written in Hebrew, and was part of the books of the Septuagint, the Old Testament of the Apostles and the early Christian Church.

This book is accepted as inspired and canonical by the Orthodox Church in the Greek Orthodox Bible, and in the books of the Old Testament of the Vulgate, and was included in the canon of inspired scripture by Pope Damasus I and the Synod of Rome (382), and subsequent councils such as the Council of Hippo (393), the Third Council of Carthage (397), and reaffirmed at the Council of Florence of the (briefly reunited) Church of the east and west in 1442.

The Book of Daniel has never been ranked among the Nevi'im, or Prophets, by the Jews.

However, some Jews, such as those from Ethiopia, follow a different canon which is identical to the Catholic Old Testament and includes the seven deuterocanonical books.