Online dating for artists

24-Oct-2015 19:08

I would come to find later that the Alex persona had been tweaked to suit my fantasy. Alex happened to be a man who suffered terribly from a fatal disease, and after a brief online courtship, he lulled me into believing I was one of the only things that mattered in his life. Alex Lee described himself as a slim, handsome, young, autistic man who was not only a victim of abject poverty, but was dying of terminal leukemia as well. His voice, with its sultry Southern drawl, was naturally low and distinctly masculine.

While online dating is no longer taboo (more than 65 percent of Your Tango readers agree, according to our survey), the concept does still prompt feelings of distrust or wariness. Other This is the true story of an internet con artist — and I'm not the only one she fooled.As more of our friends meet the loves of their lives on sites on OKCupid and Match.com, our virtual guards remain up like invisible force fields. We met one year out of my hellacious breast cancer experience; I was a new survivor fresh off of chemotherapy. Alex Lee found me in an online art gallery, saw my gothic artwork and pinned me immediately for the sucker I would end up being.A dark, brooding creature of the night happened to be an irresistible image to certain women who should have known better, myself included. Alex consented and got on camera, and (of course) it was not a shy, brooding young man who appeared on my screen. AShe sat in front of her computer day after day with one purpose alone: to find as many people as possible "out there" who might send her money, and she knew the only way to get this money was by pretending to be someone else.My curiosity to see the face of the man I'd been so desperately in love with finally overwhelmed me. With so many of us in hot pursuit of love relationships, the criteria for Teresa's search became quite obvious.That should have been a glaring red flag, of course, but Alex was autistic and way too shy to share something so intimate.

While online dating is no longer taboo (more than 65 percent of Your Tango readers agree, according to our survey), the concept does still prompt feelings of distrust or wariness. Other This is the true story of an internet con artist — and I'm not the only one she fooled.

As more of our friends meet the loves of their lives on sites on OKCupid and Match.com, our virtual guards remain up like invisible force fields. We met one year out of my hellacious breast cancer experience; I was a new survivor fresh off of chemotherapy. Alex Lee found me in an online art gallery, saw my gothic artwork and pinned me immediately for the sucker I would end up being.

A dark, brooding creature of the night happened to be an irresistible image to certain women who should have known better, myself included. Alex consented and got on camera, and (of course) it was not a shy, brooding young man who appeared on my screen. AShe sat in front of her computer day after day with one purpose alone: to find as many people as possible "out there" who might send her money, and she knew the only way to get this money was by pretending to be someone else.

My curiosity to see the face of the man I'd been so desperately in love with finally overwhelmed me. With so many of us in hot pursuit of love relationships, the criteria for Teresa's search became quite obvious.

That should have been a glaring red flag, of course, but Alex was autistic and way too shy to share something so intimate.

Instead, he would send images of vampires and dark, gothic angels.